indigo

20. art student. jmu. AriesTaurus cusp. awareness.

CURRENT MOON
indigo
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karenhurley:

A study in brand minimalism
karenhurley:

A study in brand minimalism
karenhurley:

A study in brand minimalism
karenhurley:

A study in brand minimalism
karenhurley:

A study in brand minimalism
karenhurley:

A study in brand minimalism
karenhurley:

A study in brand minimalism
karenhurley:

A study in brand minimalism
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tumblropenarts:

My first collage of the year! Also, I stayed in New Mexico a few weeks ago- it looked a lot like this…
© 2014 Sarah EisenlohrDecorMagazine collageFacebook Flickr Tumblr Society6
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madeupmonkeyshit:

Kanye at 19
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likeafieldmouse:

Richard Avedon - Fashion Fiction I (1968)
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scenerylabel:

Roy Lichtenstein at work
Photograph by Laurie Lambrecht
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Kanye West for GQ Magazine August 2014 shot by Patrick Demarchelier.

Kanye West for GQ Magazine August 2014 shot by Patrick Demarchelier.

Kanye West for GQ Magazine August 2014 shot by Patrick Demarchelier.

Kanye West for GQ Magazine August 2014 shot by Patrick Demarchelier.

Kanye West for GQ Magazine August 2014 shot by Patrick Demarchelier.

Kanye West for GQ Magazine August 2014 shot by Patrick Demarchelier.

Kanye West for GQ Magazine August 2014 shot by Patrick Demarchelier.

Kanye West for GQ Magazine August 2014 shot by Patrick Demarchelier.
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karmakarmanyc:

Michael Williams
to be titled, 2014
Acrylic paint on metal pole
Dimensions variable

Edition of 3
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goodtypography:

Alexis Persani
goodtypography:

Alexis Persani
goodtypography:

Alexis Persani
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gaksdesigns:

Self-portraits by Hyper-realist painter Eloy Morales
gaksdesigns:

Self-portraits by Hyper-realist painter Eloy Morales
gaksdesigns:

Self-portraits by Hyper-realist painter Eloy Morales
gaksdesigns:

Self-portraits by Hyper-realist painter Eloy Morales
gaksdesigns:

Self-portraits by Hyper-realist painter Eloy Morales
gaksdesigns:

Self-portraits by Hyper-realist painter Eloy Morales
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brooklynstreetart:

@HuffPostArts  X @bkstreetart​ :
"The Wack Donald’s Project’ 
"Today we all are scared about terrorism, suspecting everybody around us, but no one is suspecting McDonalds to hurt us," said Mr OneTeas. ”We’ve been conditioned by it because we have grown up with it, and now if you’re looking at the Mc D restaurant world map, you will be surprised that they are everywhere.”
(By: Mr. OneTeas (photo © Jaime Rojo) 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jaime-rojo-steven-harrington/wack-donalds-project-_b_5195124.html
brooklynstreetart:

@HuffPostArts  X @bkstreetart​ :
"The Wack Donald’s Project’ 
"Today we all are scared about terrorism, suspecting everybody around us, but no one is suspecting McDonalds to hurt us," said Mr OneTeas. ”We’ve been conditioned by it because we have grown up with it, and now if you’re looking at the Mc D restaurant world map, you will be surprised that they are everywhere.”
(By: Mr. OneTeas (photo © Jaime Rojo) 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jaime-rojo-steven-harrington/wack-donalds-project-_b_5195124.html
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berndwuersching:

Lygia ClarkBicho - Em si, 1962card, adhesive tape, graphiteDiameter: 11.5 cm
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likeafieldmouse:

Filippo Minelli - Contradictions (2007)
likeafieldmouse:

Filippo Minelli - Contradictions (2007)
likeafieldmouse:

Filippo Minelli - Contradictions (2007)
likeafieldmouse:

Filippo Minelli - Contradictions (2007)
likeafieldmouse:

Filippo Minelli - Contradictions (2007)
likeafieldmouse:

Filippo Minelli - Contradictions (2007)
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free-parking:

Roman Opalka, details from OPALKA 1965/ 1-∞, 1965-2011

In 1965, in his studio in Warsaw, Opalka began painting a process of counting—from one to infinity. Starting in the top left-hand corner of the canvas and finishing in the bottom right-hand corner, the tiny numbers are painted in horizontal rows. Each new canvas, which the artist calls a ‘detail’, takes up counting where the last left off. Each ‘detail’ is the same size (196 x 135 cm), the dimension of his studio door in Warsaw. All details have the same title, 1965/1-∞; the idea does not date although the artist has pledged his life to its execution: ‘All my work is a single thing, the description from number one to infinity. A single thing, a single life.’ (via)

Opalka died on August 6, 2011. The final number he painted was 5,607,249.
"Time as we live it and as we create it embodies our progressive disappearance,” Opalka wrote in an essay in 1987. “We are at the same time alive and in the face of death — that is the mystery of all living beings.”
free-parking:

Roman Opalka, details from OPALKA 1965/ 1-∞, 1965-2011

In 1965, in his studio in Warsaw, Opalka began painting a process of counting—from one to infinity. Starting in the top left-hand corner of the canvas and finishing in the bottom right-hand corner, the tiny numbers are painted in horizontal rows. Each new canvas, which the artist calls a ‘detail’, takes up counting where the last left off. Each ‘detail’ is the same size (196 x 135 cm), the dimension of his studio door in Warsaw. All details have the same title, 1965/1-∞; the idea does not date although the artist has pledged his life to its execution: ‘All my work is a single thing, the description from number one to infinity. A single thing, a single life.’ (via)

Opalka died on August 6, 2011. The final number he painted was 5,607,249.
"Time as we live it and as we create it embodies our progressive disappearance,” Opalka wrote in an essay in 1987. “We are at the same time alive and in the face of death — that is the mystery of all living beings.”
free-parking:

Roman Opalka, details from OPALKA 1965/ 1-∞, 1965-2011

In 1965, in his studio in Warsaw, Opalka began painting a process of counting—from one to infinity. Starting in the top left-hand corner of the canvas and finishing in the bottom right-hand corner, the tiny numbers are painted in horizontal rows. Each new canvas, which the artist calls a ‘detail’, takes up counting where the last left off. Each ‘detail’ is the same size (196 x 135 cm), the dimension of his studio door in Warsaw. All details have the same title, 1965/1-∞; the idea does not date although the artist has pledged his life to its execution: ‘All my work is a single thing, the description from number one to infinity. A single thing, a single life.’ (via)

Opalka died on August 6, 2011. The final number he painted was 5,607,249.
"Time as we live it and as we create it embodies our progressive disappearance,” Opalka wrote in an essay in 1987. “We are at the same time alive and in the face of death — that is the mystery of all living beings.”
free-parking:

Roman Opalka, details from OPALKA 1965/ 1-∞, 1965-2011

In 1965, in his studio in Warsaw, Opalka began painting a process of counting—from one to infinity. Starting in the top left-hand corner of the canvas and finishing in the bottom right-hand corner, the tiny numbers are painted in horizontal rows. Each new canvas, which the artist calls a ‘detail’, takes up counting where the last left off. Each ‘detail’ is the same size (196 x 135 cm), the dimension of his studio door in Warsaw. All details have the same title, 1965/1-∞; the idea does not date although the artist has pledged his life to its execution: ‘All my work is a single thing, the description from number one to infinity. A single thing, a single life.’ (via)

Opalka died on August 6, 2011. The final number he painted was 5,607,249.
"Time as we live it and as we create it embodies our progressive disappearance,” Opalka wrote in an essay in 1987. “We are at the same time alive and in the face of death — that is the mystery of all living beings.”
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salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos. 
salahmah: Chefchaouen, a small town in northern Morocco, has a rich history, beautiful natural surroundings and wonderful architecture, but what it’s most famous for are the striking and vivid blue walls of many of the buildings in its “old town” sector, or medina.
The maze-like medina sector, like those of most of the other towns in the area, features white-washed buildings with a fusion of Spanish and Moorish architecture. The brilliantly blue walls, however, seem to be unique to Chefchaouen. They are said to have been introduced to the town by Jewish refugees in 1930, who considered blue to symbolize the sky and heaven. The color caught on, and now many also believe that the blue walls serve to repel mosquitoes as well (mosquitoes dislike clear and moving water).
Whatever the reason, the town’s blue walls attract visitors who love to wander the town’s narrow streets and snap some beautiful photos.